Guideline for Bio-Waste Management in South East Europe

Support for Bio-Waste Management in Southeast Europe
Closed
started:
2019

Bio-Waste Management support for South East European cities was provided by the Coalition's Solution Centre with the goal to educate and build the capacity of waste management operators in the region.

Objectives

The Guideline is for cities in the South-East Europe (SEE) region to inform and educate local government, utility companies, landfill operators and bio-waste treatment plant operators on adequate bio-waste management practices. 

The main objective is to divert bio-waste from landfills, preventing uncontrolled methane emissions and other negative environmental impacts from improper waste management. 

Assistance provided

The Climate and Clean Air Coalition’s Waste Initiative developed a Guideline for Bio-Waste Management in South East Europe (SEE) to educate and build the capacity of waste management operators on proper management of bio-waste. 

The Guideline outlines the necessary stages for designing and implementing proper systems for the separate collection and treatment of bio-waste. This includes collecting reliable data on the quantities of generated and collected waste, and the composition of waste. Methods for determining the composition of waste, separate collection of bio-waste, and relevant and realistic treatment options that can be applied in the SEE region are also included. 

Transitioning from landfilling to more beneficial practices depends, in large extent, on the level of socio-economic development, awareness, and policy. 

The Guideline details methods for biological waste treatment, composting and anaerobic digestion, listing the advantages and disadvantages of both methods. It also outlines the activities needed to establish an adequate bio-waste management system, like determining municipal waste composition for proper planning and system design, and separate bio-waste collection. 

City of Bijeljina, Bosnia and Herzegovina 

  • Bio-waste Diversion Study: The aim of the Bio-waste diversion Study in Bijeljina was to define activities towards achieving emission reductions of short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs), while improving the waste management system. The study focuses on management of bio-waste in the Bijeljina region and includes: estimation of the amount of bio-waste generated in the region; determination of the optimal and pessimistic scenario in terms of the amount of separately collected bio-waste fractions; as well as defining potential treatment options for collected bio-waste. 
  • Study on Technical requirements for construction and management of composting plant: This study assessed the capacity of the City and the Bijeljina Region in terms of composting separately collected bio-waste, evaluated required technical and technological conditions for the composting plant of different capacities recommended for the Bijeljina Region, described the composting process and monitoring of process parameters, and defined and manage the potential environmental impacts of the composting plant and operations. 
  • Compost Market Study: The aim of the Compost Market Study for the Bijeljina Region was to evaluate the market potential for the compost produced, in terms of its use in agriculture as an organic fertilizer or as a soil amendment. The Study shows the current state of production, supply and use of artificial fertilizers in the Bijeljina Region and Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH), and provides an assessment of the possibility of using compost as an alternative tool in agriculture, landscaping or on landfills, as well as the number of potential users - farmers. 

City of Novi Sad, Serbia 

  • Guidelines for diversion and composting of Bio-waste: The purpose of the Guidelines for diversion and composting of Bio-waste is to assess the capacities of the City of Novi Sad and the South Backa Region in terms of composting segregated collected bio-waste, evaluate required technical and technological conditions for the composting plant of different capacities recommended for the City of Novi Sad, describe the composting process and monitoring of process parameters, and define and manage the potential environmental impact of the composting plant and operations. The Guideline is intended for the composting plant operator to educate its staff on proper and adequate operations on the plant. 

City of Vrbas, Serbia 

  • Implementation plan for source separation of bio-waste and other waste streams: The objective of the Implementation plan for source separation of bio-waste and other waste streams is to evaluate the possibility of separate collection of different waste streams in the town of Vrbas; estimation of capital and operational costs for the introduction of source separation system; as well as the selection of the methods and phases for implementation of separate collection with the special focus on bio-waste. 

Southeast Europe Region 
 

  • Guideline for Bio-waste management in the SEE Region The Guideline describes all stages necessary for the design and implementation of a proper system for the separate collection and treatment of bio-waste, including the collection of reliable data on the quantities of generated and collected waste, and the composition of waste. Also presented are methods for determining the composition of waste, separate collection of bio-waste, as well as relevant treatment options that can realistically be applied in the region. 

Challenges

Inadequate organic waste treatment can pollute the soil, air, and surface and groundwater. Management of bio-waste must therefore be properly organized and regulated. The non-EU South East European Countries still need to implement national legislative measures, which are harmonized with EU Directives.  

Key European Union waste management directives require the EU Member States to meet targets for recycling materials and diverting biodegradable waste from landfills. Member States are required to meet specific targets for material recycling, separate collection of bio-waste and the diversion of biodegradable waste from landfills. Thanks to the combination of the long-term and short-term objectives defined by the Directive, as well as its flexibility, EU Member States are testing and implementing several waste diversion strategies found in municipal waste management programs and plans. Countries applying for full EU membership may deviate from the objectives defined by the EU Directives during the negotiation process, but the targets become active as soon as countries attain EU membership.   

Who's involved

Lead Partner: A Coalition partner with an active role in coordinating, monitoring and guiding the work of an initiative.

Implementer: A Coalition partner or actor receiving Coalition funds to implement an activity or initiative.

Activity contact

Sandra Mazo-Nix ,
Municipal Solid Waste Initiative Coordinator
Sandra.Mazo-Nix [at] un.org

Initiatives

Pollutants (SLCP)

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